On Display at Gallery on Queen

Category: arts 70

Wabanaki 2022 is a multidisciplinary exhibition curated by Nadia Khoury to honour and highlight the work and heritage of Indigenous artists from Atlantic Canada.

Masks by Ned Bear on display at Gallery on Queen as part of the exhibition Wabanaki 2022.

(Fredericton) Last Friday, Gallery on Queen opened the new exhibition Wabanaki 2022, a multidisciplinary exhibition curated by Nadia Khoury that honours and highlights the work and heritage of Indigenous artists from Atlantic Canada. The collection includes works from painters,  woodcarvers, silversmiths, bead and quill artists, ceramists and late master artists.  

The work of east coast Indigenous artists tells the important story of the people most affected by the arrival of the settlers. Wabanaki is a rare cornucopia of traditional and artistic knowledge infused with personal experiences of the modern-day.  

The Wabanaki people, also known as the People of the Dawn, are the easternmost tribes of Turtle Island, also referred to as Northeastern woodland tribes. Their culture and language have  been in existence for over 10,000 years. Mi’kmaq, Wolastoqewik, Penobscot, Passamaquoddy  and Abenaki are the member tribes: Tribes that have endured the earliest and most prolonged  contact with the new man on this continent. 

Wabanaki Artists: Audrey Arseneault, Ingrid Brooks, Brian Francis, Frannie Francis, Tara  Francis, Charlie Gaffney, Marcus Gosse, Tim Hogan, Nancy Oakley, Melissa Peter-Paul,  Chantal Polchies, Shane Perley-Dutcher, Percy Sacobie, Justin Sappier, Garry Sanipass, Alan  Syliboy. Late master artists: Ned Bear and Roger Simon.

Keep to to date with new and current exhibitions at Gallery on Queen by visiting galleryonqueen.com 

Cover image by Percy Sacobie. 

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