Midweek Music Mix: Spotlighting New Releases from New Brunswick Artists

Category: music 88

This week we look at the latest releases from Cloud Ruins, Chris Colepaugh and Wangled Teb. 

Matt Carter

Cloud Ruins – SODA EP

Whenever I see a musician or a group releasing a high volume of music in a short period of time, that usually makes me question the quality of what they’re putting out. Now, I know questioning the quality of art opens up a whole can of worms and even by typing those words just now I feel a bit icky about it.  But my feelings are somewhat justified. As someone who regularly combs through streaming platforms looking for #newnewbrunswickmusic, I have come across a few instances where I found myself wondering, “WTF? Why did you put this out?” There is a connection in there somewhere. 

Having said, I had my obvious reservations about Could Ruins’ SODA EP. After all, it is the twelfth release from this project led by Fredericton musician David McFarlane to come out this year, and the sixth since the beginning of the summer. But it’s also the first EP to arrive after a long run of single releases dating back to January of this year.

SODA EP is literally five songs (and a remix) all about soda pop. “I don’t know but I’ve been told, soda pop is better than gold.” In a time when we’ve come to learn just how bad these cans of sugar water are for us, I love that McFarlane feels so passionate about his love for things like ginger ale that he was compelled to pen a batch of songs completely devoted to these now out-of-favour beverages. Maybe pop is the new Satan and he’s on the cusp of a whole new genre of music, like Venom or Slayer once were. Only time will tell. It only takes one good album to set the wheels in motion and this could be it. Show No Mercy.   

Chris Colepaugh – Could Have Been 

Chris Colepaugh can do no wrong. The Moncton-based super-talent has been writing songs and performing for two decades; he’s toured the country several times; he’s dabbled in rock, folk, blues and he’s won or been nominated for a staggering amount of music awards here in New Brunswick, on the east coast and nationally. He’s also the current drummer with Canadian reggae rock institution Big Sugar. So when Chris releases new music, it’s always worth a listen.

In January of 2019 Chris committed to writing, recording and releasing a track a month. Could Have Been, released in July, is the seventh track in the series and as expected, it’s a solid track. It actually reminds me of the 70s/80s acoustic power ballads I used to hear on the radio as a kid. Big harmonies, huge hooks, lots of emotion…it gives me flashbacks to my childhood when the occasional song would make me cry for no reason. I’m not crying now, but I would be if I was 10, or 11, or 25. Ok, I’m tearing up. Thanks Chris! 

Wangled Teb – Dark Place (Black Water Mix) 

The thing I like most about Wangled Teb, the main creative outlet for Fredericton musician Indigo Poirier, is the amount of variety she injects into her music. Most often referring to what she does as breakcore a la Aphex Twin or Venetian Snares, Poirier takes her music further with each new release and this new single via TwoFifteen Records is a perfect example. For one, it may be the most focused composition of all her releases and it is certainly one of the first to not rely so heavily on breakneck rhythms, the type that make you consider holding on to something sturdy before pressing play.    

Dark Place (Black Water Mix) is a slow progression that builds layer upon layer without sounding devoid of imagination. There is a depth to this composition that reveals a larger vision, something more than simply triggering the next synced sample. 

I like where Indigo is taking us and like her TwoFifteen debut Seasonal Depression, I’m already excited to hear what comes next. 

Send us your Music!

If you are a New Brunswick artist or group, have new music on the way and would like to be considered for a future edition of Midweek Music Mix, send us the details at gridcitymagazine(at)gmail.com

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